Shrimping in the rain

I have the immense privilege and pleasure of living on the east coast of Florida in a little city called Titusville. Aside of being a community of great people there really is not much to this place, unless you count the fact that we overlook Kennedy Space Centre and get a front row seat for every single rocket launch that goes from this next of the woods.

The other thing that we have is a pretty cool bridge.

Maxbrewerbridgeandpier

The ‘A. Max Brewer Bridge’ runs from our quiet, somewhat sleepy little city over the Indian River Lagoon and down the other side to take you into the Canaveral National Seashore and Playalinda Beach. Just underneath the bridge is the Veterans Memorial Fishing Pier, known locally as ‘the worlds longest free fishing pier.’ I don’t know if it is or if it is not actually the worlds longest free fishing pier, but this I do know, every night of the week the pier attracts a crowd of fishers.

Tonight, I was down in that neck of the woods for a spot of exercise – the bridge is popular for runners and walkers (those who know me will know for sure which category I fall into). I crossed the bridge the for the first time and as I was doing so the rain started to come down pretty heavily. It was good rain – not heavy enough to put a body off, but enough for me to be soaked through fairly quickly. I made it over the bridge and started back across on the other side. As I neared the end of the bridge my eyes were diverted downwards to my right where a group of around a dozen fishermen had decided to stick out the shower and were casting their nets just as they would on any other night. I forgot to mention above, the night fishers are actually shrimpers. They come down and spend the night throwing nets over the side of the pier in the hope of catching fresh shrimp.

As I walked down the home straight of the bridge I believed I encountered a bunch of men who, regardless of the rain and the fact that they were soaked to the skin, were casting their nets into the Indian River with a persistent vision of hope – hope of a catch, which might in turn become dinner, or maybe even be turned in to a dollar or two.

Thinking of their hope, of course brought me back to Advent and in particular this idea of Advent hope – a hope which has us looking forward with great anticipation; great yearning for the breaking through of light into the darkness. Goodness knows the darkness of this last year could do with a dose of hope-filled light.

I wonder will I be willing to walk out the steps of my day tomorrow in the same way as those shrimpers were casting their nets – with a persistent sense of hope. It strikes me that maintaining a persistent vision of hope is one of the most important things that I can do in the world right now.

“In him was life and that life was the light of all mankind.” (John 1:4)

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About belfrev

I am in my 30's, have been married for 15 years and have two fantastic children. Life is content. Ministry is demanding - I feel like I get it wrong more than i get it right God is good.
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